News

Five months pregnant on the first day - How Lunnie’s founder, Sarah Kallile, navigated breastfeeding & working at a children’s hospital

Proud Ounces: If you meet Sarah Kallile today, you’ll know her as a mother to two daughters who is bravely fighting back against the uncomfortable, inefficient nursing bras that many a mom has tried and then relegated to the back of the drawer with all of the other rejected underthings. Her company, Lunnie, stands for the innovation and progress that the breastfeeding community badly needs as she works to reinvent this essential garment. Prior to this chapter in her life, Sarah worked in a very different type of job where just like so many of us, she struggled to reach her pumping & working goals due to a lack of space, policy and a supportive culture. Read on to hear about Sarah’s experience.

Image-empty-state.png

August 10, 2021

How Motherhood Gave Sarah Kallile the Confidence to Launch Lunnie

Partum: We couldn’t be more excited to connect with Sarah Kallile, founder of Lunnie. Sarah is a mom of two adorable girls and recently launched Lunnie with the mission to build the perfect nursing bra.

While breastfeeding her second daughter, she was frustrated with her clunky nursing bra and how it made her feel frumpy. She began to ask around and realized just how many mothers felt the same way!

We love Sarah’s story for so many reasons – she’s beyond focused on including a community of real mothers along the journey as she works to create the perfect nursing bra. And she’s taking this entire journey as a learning lesson for her and her daughters.

Keep reading to learn more about Lunnie, Sarah’s entrepreneurial journey and how motherhood gave her the confidence and urgency to launch a business. (The Lunnie bra hasn’t launched yet but we can’t wait to feature it on the Partum marketplace once it’s available!)

Image-empty-state.png

August 30, 2021

Local Biz Limelight: Lunnie offers products exclusively for postpartum audience

Dayton Business Journal: After the birth of her second child, Sarah Kallile was frustrated with the frumpy, big, matronly look of her nursing bra, a necessity for many moms postpartum.

Determined to find an alternative, Kallile sought the advice of friends who admitted to feeling similarly. In a state of curiosity, she sent a survey to friends and family who shared the link online. It spread quickly and, suddenly, Kallile had hundreds of responses echoing her experience and displeasure.

“I found that 84% of moms are dissatisfied with their nursing bras, which is ridiculous,” Kallile said. “A mom is wearing a garment for years on her body 24/7 that she doesn't like. This is a huge problem.”

Image-empty-state.png

October 12, 2021

Oakwood entrepreneur, mother wins $10,000 business grant at Female Founders Day event

Oakwood Register: Oakwood's Sarah Kallile, founder of the online business Lunnie, received a $10,000 grant, presented by Klarna, and was named the winner of The Big Pitcher competition at Female Founders Day: The Business Blueprint event last week.

Image-empty-state.png

April 7, 2021

Sarah Kallile of Lunnie on building the first community-led brand for modern mothers

Entreprenista: Lunnie is not only making products. We’re launching a movement to support moms who have been underserved. The stigma around breastfeeding is stifling innovation. Doctors encourage it but society tells mom to whisper about it. This leaves moms in the shadows and unprepared. The time for change is now. I hope you join us!

Image-empty-state.png

July 1, 2021

WFH warriors: From diaper changes during Zoom meetings to investor calls in the car, 18 VCs and startup founders open up about how they survived the pandemic year

Business Insider: It goes without saying, working parents have had a tough year.

Between school closures, online learning, and preparing endless meals — while trying to maintain Zoom calls and meet work deadlines — it's no wonder parents are leaving the workforce in record droves.

According to the Pew Research Center, fewer parents in the US are working due to the Covid-19 pandemic, and those who are still at work have cut their hours.

Image-empty-state.png

July 19, 2021